Friday, April 18, 2014

"Frontman of rising Nottingham duo Sleaford Mods hits out at retromania and the dearth of protest music - 'Noel Gallagher's got blood on his hands''"

full story at NME.com

Actually the full full story is in the newsprint edition of NME  but the website has a taster:

Stating that their name is not meant to be ironic, frontman Jason Williamson of the Nottingham based rap duo, confirms that he grew up as a Mod but turned away when the scene became too retro for him. "Creatively speaking, Noel Gallagher's got blood on his hands." Elsewhere, Williamson decries the lack of politically outspoken music in 2014, saying; "Ever since Thatcher got in and cut everything to the bone, it should have been protest music all the way."
Read more at http://www.nme.com/news/oasis/76793#Oaq4Seeo0TpMPZkE.99
"Stating that their name is not meant to be ironic, frontman Jason Williamson of the Nottingham based rap duo, confirms that he grew up as a Mod but turned away when the scene became too retro for him. "Creatively speaking, Noel Gallagher's got blood on his hands." Elsewhere, Williamson decries the lack of politically outspoken music in 2014, saying; "Ever since Thatcher got in and cut everything to the bone, it should have been protest music all the way."

Stating that their name is not meant to be ironic, frontman Jason Williamson of the Nottingham based rap duo, confirms that he grew up as a Mod but turned away when the scene became too retro for him. "Creatively speaking, Noel Gallagher's got blood on his hands." Elsewhere, Williamson decries the lack of politically outspoken music in 2014, saying; "Ever since Thatcher got in and cut everything to the bone, it should have been protest music all the way."
Read more at http://www.nme.com/news/oasis/76793#Oaq4Seeo0TpMPZkE.99
 I don't know about "blood on his hands" but this post-peak Oasis #1 single, recently discussed on Popular, is culturcide or historycide -  something of that order of atrocity:




Good group, Sleaford Mods





Sorta like Pitman, but for real.

reissue culture reaches 2001!

reissue culture reaches 2001!

viz, the Life Without Buildings reissue
 
which is also


reissue culture takes on the already-retro/revivalist/recyclical !

(what next in the postpunk revival revival? The Erase Errata Box Set? A deluxe expanded They Threw Us All in a Trench and Stuck a Monument on Top?)


and also, finally


 reissue culture takes on the not-much-cop-in-the-first-place-let's-be-honest !

(except that's hardly a new development)



There's probably some examples of reissues of records after 2001 that I'm not thinking of.... well there was that 10th Anniversary Interpol job of course...

Tuesday, April 8, 2014

this was tomorrow # パビリオン内覧会





















"The concept of "space"--in all senses: outer, inner, architectural-- suggests itself irresistibly when you listen to the music of the post-WW2 vanguard... The new music often featured alarming panning effects that exploited the disorienting spatial possibilities of stereophony, so that the composer worked with blocs of timbre that moved through space as they moved in time. ... Increasingly, composers explored quadraphonic or eight-speaker set-ups: sounds circled around the listener’s head, swooped and veered, receded and surged.  Stockhausen had a spherical auditorium built to his specifications at the 1970 World's Fair in Osaka, Japan, with nests for musicians scattered throughout the audience; the latter sat at "the equator", on a sound transparent platform, and surrounded by fifty speakers distributed in ten circles (eight above the equator, two below)." -- from "Out of Space: Nostalgia for Giant Steps and Final Frontiers", chapter 11 of  Retromania

Nick Currie: "I was just watching your recent appearance on the talkshow Charlie Rose and I was interested in something you said about the Osaka Expo in 1970: that it was, in a sense the high point of humanity and that things have been going downhill ever since...."
Rem Koolhaas: "I was referring more to the spirit of the world’s reaction to both the launch of Concorde and the Moon landing than to the Expo itself. But it’s not only about technical prowess: it’s more to do with what can be imagined and what dimension imagination has in serious life. An organization like NASA was, essentially, 4,000 people seriously entertaining fantasy: that scale of working on visionary elements is now incredibly reduced. At the moment we want to achieve goals that are very imminent, very realistic. Few organisations are able to define an unconventional aim and then to engineer its implementation, even over a period of ten or 12 years. These days, projects often have a maximum of only four years in which to be realized, as that’s the typical period that a politician is in power."

- from a Frieze dialogue between Nick Currie and Rem Koolhaas  on the occasion of RK's's Project Japan: Metabolism Talks